Ladies and gentlemen, your 2013 National League All-Star starting pitcher.

Ladies and gentlemen, your 2013 National League All-Star starting pitcher.

The Mets released Rickey [Henderson] in May 2000, which meant that he helped us to the playoffs in his only full season with the ball club. He was instrumental in not only getting us there, but in how the playoff shares—the bonuses earned from MLB for each postseason series—were divided. The shares meeting is always an interesting exercise in human dynamics, sort of a microcosm of democracy. Rickey was the most generous guy I ever played with, and whenever the discussion came around to what we should give one of the fringe people—whether it was a minor leaguer who came up for a few days or the parking lot attendant—Rickey would shout out, ‘Full share!’ We’d argue for a while and he’d say, ‘Fuck that! You can change somebody’s life!’ I admired Rickey’s heart, but I usually came down somewhere in the middle.

Mike Piazza

(via @timmarchman)

As we already suspected, Rickey Henderson is the best. Mike Piazza? Probably kind of a dick.

In September of 2011, the Mets tried to buy land from the city of New York next to their stadium in order to operate a casino. Because investing with Bernie Madoff and signing Jason Bay to a long-term contract weren’t enough to satisfy the Wilpon family’s urge to gamble.

The deal fell through because live-dealer casinos are illegal in New York, except for on tribal lands. They tried to argue that it should be allowed, since vice president of player development and scouting Peter Brand Paul DePodesta used to work for the Cleveland Indians, but that doesn’t count. While Sterling Equities, the real estate company operated by the Wiplon family, is still building an entertainment complex, there’s not going to be a casino there. “Don’t bet on it,” said a representative for the Wiplons. “Actually, you want to bet on it? I’ll give you three-to-one. Or we can just roll dice in the parking lot. Come ON, I need this! Daddy needs a new pair of shoes! And another left-handed reliever!”

siphotos:

Gary Carter passed away this afternoon at age 57. The catcher played for four teams during his 19-year career (Expos, Mets, Giants, Dodgers) and made the all-star team 11 times. (Andrew C. Bernstein/Getty Images)
GALLERY: Rare Photos of Gary Carter

siphotos:

Gary Carter passed away this afternoon at age 57. The catcher played for four teams during his 19-year career (Expos, Mets, Giants, Dodgers) and made the all-star team 11 times. (Andrew C. Bernstein/Getty Images)

GALLERY: Rare Photos of Gary Carter

This would go straight to DVD. It might even skip DVD and go directly to VHS.