siphotos:

Dodgers’ catcher Mike Piazza, a member of the Major League All-Star Team, shakes hands with Orix BlueWaves’ outfielder Ichiro Suzuki during their workout for the opener of the eight-game Super Major Series at the Tokyo Dome in Japan on Oct. 31, 1996. (AP)
GALLERY: Classic Photos of Ichiro Suzuki

siphotos:

Dodgers’ catcher Mike Piazza, a member of the Major League All-Star Team, shakes hands with Orix BlueWaves’ outfielder Ichiro Suzuki during their workout for the opener of the eight-game Super Major Series at the Tokyo Dome in Japan on Oct. 31, 1996. (AP)

GALLERY: Classic Photos of Ichiro Suzuki

I would approach with my fist pulled back. I figured he’d throw his glove out for protection. I’d parry the glove and then get after it.
Mike Piazza, who took karate lessons to prepare for a potential fight with Roger Clemens. But he never anticipated that Clemens would throw a broken bat at him. Never bring a fist to a bat fight! You should have been fencing, Mike!
The Mets released Rickey [Henderson] in May 2000, which meant that he helped us to the playoffs in his only full season with the ball club. He was instrumental in not only getting us there, but in how the playoff shares—the bonuses earned from MLB for each postseason series—were divided. The shares meeting is always an interesting exercise in human dynamics, sort of a microcosm of democracy. Rickey was the most generous guy I ever played with, and whenever the discussion came around to what we should give one of the fringe people—whether it was a minor leaguer who came up for a few days or the parking lot attendant—Rickey would shout out, ‘Full share!’ We’d argue for a while and he’d say, ‘Fuck that! You can change somebody’s life!’ I admired Rickey’s heart, but I usually came down somewhere in the middle.

Mike Piazza

(via @timmarchman)

As we already suspected, Rickey Henderson is the best. Mike Piazza? Probably kind of a dick.