Baseball. Forever.

Baseball. Forever.

So the Tigers and Pirates are feeling pretty good about themselves.

Opening Day 2014

Courtesy @manthonywtrf

Opening Day 2014

Courtesy @manthonywtrf

Ralph Kiner, Hall of Fame slugger who died on February 6, will be honored by both the Pirates and Mets this season.

The Pirates who retired his number in 1987, will wear the “4” patch for 2014. The Mets will honor Kiner, the last living member of the franchise’s original television broadcast team, with a microphone patch.

Here is Kiner’s obit from February.

Source:

Pirates patch courtesy of @mlb 

Mets patch is courtesy of centerfieldmaz.com

February 26, 2014
pirates

February 26, 2014

pirates

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: The Pirates’ Only Living Hall of Famer
So many trivia questions, so little time:
What player has the most career home runs in their first 5 seasons? 
Who is the only player to lead his league in home runs for 7 consecutive seasons?
Who was the first  National League slugger to hit 50+ home runs in two consecutive seasons?
Who was the second person, after Babe Ruth, to hit at least 40 home runs in five consecutive seasons? 
Who was the only National Leaguer to hit at least 54 home runs between 1931 and 1997?
The answer to all of these questions is “Ralph Kiner.”
And yet, he was barely elected to the Hall of Fame, receiving 273 votes (he needed 272) in 1975 his 15th and final year of eligibility, from the Baseball Writers Association of America. Even the Pittsburgh Pirates, for whom he set all those records, didn’t retire his uniform number, 4, for another twelve years.
Part of the reason for the Hall of Fame delay was his limited time on the field. Mr. Kiner retired from baseball at age 32 after a back injury made it impossible for him to play. It was so hampering that after his first seven seasons he had hit 294 home runs, but in his last three only 75. 
And the Pirates were terrible during his time with the franchise. Between the time Mr. Kiner joined the team in 1946 and when he was traded to the Chicago Cubs in 1953, Pittsburgh never finished higher than fourth and usually in the bottom half of the National League standings. (Later Pirates Hall of Famers, like Willie Stargell and Roberto Clemente, were part of perennial playoff contenders including two World Series crowns.)
He did receive more recognition during his career than after. He was selected to six consecutive All-Star games (1948-1953) and finished in the top ten in MVP voting for five straight seasons (1947-1951) especially impressive playing on such abysmal teams. 
Following Mr. Kiner’s retirement he found a successful second career as a broadcaster. Spending the 1961 season with the Chicago White Sox, Mr. Kiner headed to New York to join the television broadcast booth with Bob Murphy and Lindsay Nelson for the expansion New York Mets. Mr. Kiner would broadcast Mets games for 52 seasons. He was the last of the original Mets’ broadcasters.
Known for misspeaking on occasion - wishing a hearty “Happy Birthday!” on Fathers’ Day - Mr. Kiner became more closely identified with the Mets than the Pirates by the end of his career. (A friend of Obit of the Day who is lifelong Pittsburgh fan believes this is why he is overlooked by the Pirates and their fans.)
Ralph Kiner, the fourth oldest living Hall of Famer, died on February 6^, 2014 at the age of 91.
Sources: baseball-reference.com, National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, NY Times, and ESPN
(Image of Ralph Kiner, circa 1948-1953, is uncited - on six different websites - and courtesy of democratherald.com)
^ Coincidentally Mr. Kiner died on Babe Ruth’s birthday. Mr. Ruth was the only person to hit home runs more often than Mr. Kiner (11.76 at-bats per home run vs. 14.11) until the sluggers of the 1990s.

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: The Pirates’ Only Living Hall of Famer

So many trivia questions, so little time:

What player has the most career home runs in their first 5 seasons? 

Who is the only player to lead his league in home runs for 7 consecutive seasons?

Who was the first  National League slugger to hit 50+ home runs in two consecutive seasons?

Who was the second person, after Babe Ruth, to hit at least 40 home runs in five consecutive seasons? 

Who was the only National Leaguer to hit at least 54 home runs between 1931 and 1997?

The answer to all of these questions is “Ralph Kiner.”

And yet, he was barely elected to the Hall of Fame, receiving 273 votes (he needed 272) in 1975 his 15th and final year of eligibility, from the Baseball Writers Association of America. Even the Pittsburgh Pirates, for whom he set all those records, didn’t retire his uniform number, 4, for another twelve years.

Part of the reason for the Hall of Fame delay was his limited time on the field. Mr. Kiner retired from baseball at age 32 after a back injury made it impossible for him to play. It was so hampering that after his first seven seasons he had hit 294 home runs, but in his last three only 75. 

And the Pirates were terrible during his time with the franchise. Between the time Mr. Kiner joined the team in 1946 and when he was traded to the Chicago Cubs in 1953, Pittsburgh never finished higher than fourth and usually in the bottom half of the National League standings. (Later Pirates Hall of Famers, like Willie Stargell and Roberto Clemente, were part of perennial playoff contenders including two World Series crowns.)

He did receive more recognition during his career than after. He was selected to six consecutive All-Star games (1948-1953) and finished in the top ten in MVP voting for five straight seasons (1947-1951) especially impressive playing on such abysmal teams. 

Following Mr. Kiner’s retirement he found a successful second career as a broadcaster. Spending the 1961 season with the Chicago White Sox, Mr. Kiner headed to New York to join the television broadcast booth with Bob Murphy and Lindsay Nelson for the expansion New York Mets. Mr. Kiner would broadcast Mets games for 52 seasons. He was the last of the original Mets’ broadcasters.

Known for misspeaking on occasion - wishing a hearty “Happy Birthday!” on Fathers’ Day - Mr. Kiner became more closely identified with the Mets than the Pirates by the end of his career. (A friend of Obit of the Day who is lifelong Pittsburgh fan believes this is why he is overlooked by the Pirates and their fans.)

Ralph Kiner, the fourth oldest living Hall of Famer, died on February 6^, 2014 at the age of 91.

Sources: baseball-reference.com, National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, NY Times, and ESPN

(Image of Ralph Kiner, circa 1948-1953, is uncited - on six different websites - and courtesy of democratherald.com)

^ Coincidentally Mr. Kiner died on Babe Ruth’s birthday. Mr. Ruth was the only person to hit home runs more often than Mr. Kiner (11.76 at-bats per home run vs. 14.11) until the sluggers of the 1990s.

Baseball Hall of Famer and long-time Mets broadcaster Ralph Kiner died today.

Kiner was 91. From 1946-1952 he led the National League in home runs, the only person to lead a league for seven consecutive seasons. He hit 54 home runs in 1948, no one would hit more until Roger Maris hit 61 in 1961 and no one hit more in the National League until Mark McGwire hit 70 in 1998.

Kiner also hit a home run every 14.1 at bats, fourth behind Ruth (who was born on February 6, coincidentally), Bonds, and McGwire.

He was also the last original TV broadcaster for the NY Mets joining the team for their inaugural season in 1962 and serving as a guest analyst through last season.

Sources: Baseball Hall of Fame, baseball-reference.com, Wikipedia

Top image: Kiner, circa 1946, copyright Corbis.com and courtesy of baseballhistorypodcast.com

Bottom image: Bob Murphy (brother of Jack Murphy of San Diego fame), Lindsey Nelson, and Ralph Kiner, circa 1962, courtesy of 2guystalkingmetsbaseball.com

Andrew McCutchen in Little League
@MLBFanCave

Andrew McCutchen in Little League

@MLBFanCave

If Pirates fans start chanting your name, you will blow up.

This guy promised his 4-year-old son that the next time the Pirates were in the playoffs he would dress up “to make him proud.”
The 4-year-old is now 25, and the dad is amazing.
Courtesy MLB.com

This guy promised his 4-year-old son that the next time the Pirates were in the playoffs he would dress up “to make him proud.”

The 4-year-old is now 25, and the dad is amazing.

Courtesy MLB.com

fishingboatproceeds:

The Pirates are winning their one game playoff. Crowd going nuts. I’m with Mike Birbiglia. Life is weird.

Famous author of young adult books providing awesome shots of the game.

fishingboatproceeds:

The Pirates are winning their one game playoff. Crowd going nuts. I’m with Mike Birbiglia. Life is weird.

Famous author of young adult books providing awesome shots of the game.

Now I know what 21 years of pent-up frustration dressed up in black looks like.
John Smoltz, admiring the PNC Park crowd
Blackout
PNC Park
10/1/13

@JeffPassan

Blackout
PNC Park
10/1/13

@JeffPassan

Pirates Drinking Game

Courtesy of yahoosports and created by oldtimefamilybaseball (the biggest Pirates fan on tumblr…now with evidence):

One Sip

- Reference to 20-year losing streak.

- TBS advertisement for something that’s “Very Funny.”

- Discussion of Andrew McCutchen's MVP merits.

Gerrit Cole is referred to as “Cole 45.”

- Crowd shots of Primanti Bros sandwiches.

- Close-ups of Justin Morneau’s mustache.

Pirates player makes the Zoltan.

- Pirates score a run or a pitcher successfully lays down a sacrifice bunt.

- Reds batter strikes out.

- Mention of Liriano’s home ERA (1.47) compared to his road ERA (4.33).

A Hearty Gulp

- Crowd shots of the beer vendor with the great mustache and ’70s uniform.

- AJ Burnett’s love of Batman is mentioned.

- Gerrit Cole is referred to as “Cole Train.”

- Any footage of Roberto Clemente, Willie Stargell, Kent Tekulve, or Andy Van Slyke.

- Discussion of Andrew McCutchen’s MVP merits using advanced statistics.

Francisco Liriano exudes some semblance of effort when up to bat.

- Any mention of Dave Littlefield or Cam Bonifay.

- Pirates’ bullpen is called the Shark Tank.

- Discussion of Francisco Liriano’s increased slider usage.

- Marlon Byrd once again comes up with a big hit to drive in a run.

- Neil Walker’s hometown affiliation with Pittsburgh is mentioned.

- On-screen graphic comparing Pirates’ payroll to rest of the league.

Finish Your Drink

- Pedro Alvarez swings and misses on a slider low and away and then crushes a home run on the next pitch.

- Gerrit Cole is referred to as “Cole Slaw.”

- Anyone talks about how many runs Russell Martin contributed solely by his behind the plate defense and pitch framing.

- If Jack Wilson is helicoptered in for the start of the game.

- The Sid Bream slide is shown (you’ll need it).

- Clint Hurdle is applauded for embracing defensive shifts.

- Francisco Liriano gets a hit.

- Discussion of Pirates’ minor-league development program and top prospects.

Spin Around In a Circle, Raise Your Arms Above Your Head, Cheer Wildly, and Buy a Round for Everyone

- Pirates hit a grand slam.

- Starling Marte steals three bases.

- Andrew McCutchen robs a home run.

- Vin Mazzaro, Tony Watson, Mark Melancon, or Jason Grilli enter a game with runners on base and, like they did all season, keep the Reds from scoring.

- Clint Barmes enters as a defensive replacement and makes a game-saving, highlight-worthy catch.

Wrap Your Arms Around a Loved One and Cry Deep, Beautiful Tears

- The Pirates win.

At this point you’d have to wonder if another team was even playing in the game tonight…

At this point you’d have to wonder if another team was even playing in the game tonight…

(Source: pittsburgh-sports)