Yankee fans boo a cardboard cutout of Robinson Cano before his return to the Stadium as a Mariner….except Robinson is hiding behind the cutout.

Courtesy of The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon.

Mariners, ftw.

Mariners, ftw.

The ‘82 Mariners had a tugboat to bring pitchers in from the bullpen. 
Posted without comment
(@MLBCathedrals)

The ‘82 Mariners had a tugboat to bring pitchers in from the bullpen. 

Posted without comment

(@MLBCathedrals)

Cardinals - 25 seasons under .500
Mariners - 27 seasons under .500

Cardinals - 25 seasons under .500

Mariners - 27 seasons under .500

mightyflynn:

4000

Not sure how to feel about this. Obviously it’s a wonderful achievement, but does it matter? I am not dismissing his hits in Japan but that’s just not how statistics work in baseball.

It’s cool. But as Joe Posnanski mentioned on twitter it’s like Warren Moon’s 70K yards in the NFL and CFL - impressive but just trivia.

I do hope Ichiro makes it into the Hall but it won’t be because of 4,000 combined hits. (Let’s be honest there will be some sportswriters who will actually hold it against him. But then again any group that didn’t elect Ty Cobb, Babe Ruth, Hank Aaron, Willie Mays, Mickey Mantle or Frank Robinson unanimously has lots of problems.)

Pickin' On Series - Bagged Me A Homer
499 plays

Yesterday we learned how cool the Mariners’ PR staff was.

Today we learned that their internet media folks do a fine job as well. Between innings on their MLB.com feed for their game against the Reds, they played a cover of “Bagged Me a Homer,” made famous by Lurleen Lumpkin in The Simpsons’ third season episode “Colonel Homer.”

So to recap:

1) A Simpsons song

2) about baseball

3) covered by a bluegrass artist.

I’m pretty sure the Mariners’ bandwagon has plenty of space.

(“Bagged Me a Homer” from Four Finger Music: The Bluegrass Tribute to the Music Made Famous by The Simpsons is copyright CMH Records, 2007)

oldtimefamilybaseball:

mightyflynn:

“Mariners: Hottest Thing in Town” (2013)

The Mariners ad team produces things that just make people happy. 

oldtimefamilybaseball:

image

And the king, though fairly well compensated before now, will finally be paid like one. Sadly, this will only mean an end of the King Felix to the Yankees rumors for about three or four months.

And while some will claim that this is an overpay and that it will upset the pitching market for…

livelymorgue:

June 2, 1985: Against the Yankees at Yankee Stadium, the motivated Mariners squeaked by with a 7-6 win, but not before Durwood Merill, the first base umpire, ejected Chuch Cottier, the Mariners’ manager, from the game. The article went on: “After animatedly arguing nose-to-nose with Merrill for several minutes, Cottier yanked the first base out of the ground and heaved it into right field. Then he returned to the dugout, where grabbed, in no particular order, four bats and four helmets and flung them onto the field. Then he went into the runway leading to the clubhouse, laughed and said, ‘Now go on and play.’ ” Photo: Vic DeLucia/The New York Times

King Felix Pitches the Mariners 1st Perfect Game

Felix Hernandez became the first pitcher in Mariners’ history to throw a perfect game, defeating the Tampa Bay Rays 1-0 this afternoon.

Felix’s pitching line:

9.0 IP, 0 R, 0 H, 0 BB, 12 K

This is the second Mariners’ no-hitter this year*, six men combined to throw a no-no on June 8 - a record.

This is also the first time 3 perfect games were thrown in the same season. Matt Cain threw a perfect on June 13, with 14 Ks - a major league record. Philip Humber threw a perfect game against the Mariners on April 21. (This marks the first time that a team was the victim of a perfect game and then won a perfect game in the same season.)

* Both no-hitters were won 1-0 highlighting the Mariners’ offensive woes.

Here’s a picture of A Rod rolling around in pain after getting plunked by King Felix. Here’s the video. You’re very welcome

-@deceptacle

Here’s a picture of A Rod rolling around in pain after getting plunked by King Felix. Here’s the video. You’re very welcome

-@deceptacle

Roger Jongewaard, Super Scout

In 2004, Roger Jongewaard was awarded the Roland Hemond Lifetime Achievement Award from Baseball America in honor of his career in baseball. Jongewaard was a scout, and a mighty good one at that.

Beginning with the New York Mets, Jongewaard pushed the team to draft future stars including Darryl Strawberry (#1 overall in 1980), Lenny Dykstra (13th round, 1981), and Billy Beane (#23 overall in 1980), who disappointed as a player, but made his name as the GM for the Oakland A’s and became famous as the subject of Michael Lewis’ Moneyball.

Jongewaard moved to the Seattle Mariners in 1985 and was instrumental in the decision to take a high school graduate from Moeller High School in Cincinnati: Ken Griffey, Jr. (#1 overall in 1987)*. Six years later, Jongewaard recommended drafting a high school shortstop from Florida named Alex Rodriguez (#1 overall in 1993).

Roger Jongewaard, who passed away at the age of 76, was named West Coast Scout of the Year in 2005 and was named a Legend in Scouting by the Professional Baseball Scouting Association in 2010.

Additional sources: USAToday.com and baseball-reference.com

(Image of Griffey courtey of pittpeas.mlbblogs.com; image of A-Rod is courtesy of North and South of Royal Brougham; image of Darryl Strawberry is courtesy of sikids.com and copyright of Manny Millan/SI.)

* Jongewaard convinced the Mariners to take Griffey over Cal State-Fullerton pitcher Mike Harkey. Harkey was drafted 4th by the Cubs. He would play for 8 seasons for four different teams, finishing with a 36-36 career record.

- OOTD

(Source: seattletimes.com)

Obit of the Day: On the Radar
It’s always fun to find the scouts at Spring Training. They’re the ones with a stopwatch in one hand and a radar gun in the other. Throw in some gut instinct - or a hefty dose of sabrmetrics - and you have someone armed and ready to find top pitching talent.
The radar gun wasn’t part of baseball scouting until Hal Keller, who worked for both incarnations of the Washington Senators as well as the Texas Rangers. Keller, who got the idea from Michigan State baseball coach Danny Litwhiler, realized that an accurate measurement of pitch speed would make the lives of scouts much easier. Before Keller, determining pitch speed involved a lot of math. Dividing the distance from the mound to home plate - 60’ 6” - by the time the pitch took to arrive in the catcher’s mitt would get you an approximate speed. (For those with an affinity for physics and formulas - v=d/t.) With the radar gun you simply write down the numbers you see.
Keller’s work as a scout earned him a reputation that led him to the general manager’s office of the Seattle Mariners for the 1984 and 1985 seasons. During his time the Mariners would win 148 games versus 176 losses for an unimpressive .457 winning percentage but he also helped sign some of the team’s earliest stars including Alvin Davis, Harold Reynolds, and Mark Langston.
Keller who received the George Genovese Lifetime Achievement Award in scouting from the Professional Baseball Scouts Foundation in 2010 was also the brother of Yankee outfielder and five-time All Star Charlie “King Kong” Keller. Hal Keller died at the age of 84.
Additional source: seattletimes.com
An version of this post is also found at www.obitoftheday.com.
(Image is copyright of Doug Pensinger/Getty Images and courtesy of latino.foxsports.com. The photo was cropped.)

Obit of the Day: On the Radar

It’s always fun to find the scouts at Spring Training. They’re the ones with a stopwatch in one hand and a radar gun in the other. Throw in some gut instinct - or a hefty dose of sabrmetrics - and you have someone armed and ready to find top pitching talent.

The radar gun wasn’t part of baseball scouting until Hal Keller, who worked for both incarnations of the Washington Senators as well as the Texas Rangers. Keller, who got the idea from Michigan State baseball coach Danny Litwhiler, realized that an accurate measurement of pitch speed would make the lives of scouts much easier. Before Keller, determining pitch speed involved a lot of math. Dividing the distance from the mound to home plate - 60’ 6” - by the time the pitch took to arrive in the catcher’s mitt would get you an approximate speed. (For those with an affinity for physics and formulas - v=d/t.) With the radar gun you simply write down the numbers you see.

Keller’s work as a scout earned him a reputation that led him to the general manager’s office of the Seattle Mariners for the 1984 and 1985 seasons. During his time the Mariners would win 148 games versus 176 losses for an unimpressive .457 winning percentage but he also helped sign some of the team’s earliest stars including Alvin Davis, Harold Reynolds, and Mark Langston.

Keller who received the George Genovese Lifetime Achievement Award in scouting from the Professional Baseball Scouts Foundation in 2010 was also the brother of Yankee outfielder and five-time All Star Charlie “King Kong” Keller. Hal Keller died at the age of 84.

Additional source: seattletimes.com

An version of this post is also found at www.obitoftheday.com.

(Image is copyright of Doug Pensinger/Getty Images and courtesy of latino.foxsports.com. The photo was cropped.)

(Source: suntimes.com)

All hail the Kid

All hail the Kid

Chone Figgins grounds out, 6-3

Welcome to the 2012 baseball season folks.