"An artisan with a bat whose daily pursuit of excellence produced a .338 lifetime batting average, 3,141 hits and a National League record-tying eight batting titles. Consistency was his hallmark, hitting above .300 in 19 of 20 major league seasons, including .394 in 1994. Renowned for ability to hit to all fields, frequently collecting opposite-field base hits between third base and shortstop. Struck out just once every 21 at bats. A 15-time All-Star and five-time Gold Glove award winner. Hit .371 in two World Series - 1984 [lost to Tigers] and 1998 [lost to Yankees]." 

Inducted in 2007 with 97.6% of the vote (532 of 545 ballots).

"An artisan with a bat whose daily pursuit of excellence produced a .338 lifetime batting average, 3,141 hits and a National League record-tying eight batting titles. Consistency was his hallmark, hitting above .300 in 19 of 20 major league seasons, including .394 in 1994. Renowned for ability to hit to all fields, frequently collecting opposite-field base hits between third base and shortstop. Struck out just once every 21 at bats. A 15-time All-Star and five-time Gold Glove award winner. Hit .371 in two World Series - 1984 [lost to Tigers] and 1998 [lost to Yankees]."

Inducted in 2007 with 97.6% of the vote (532 of 545 ballots).

brooklynmutt:

The single best photo of President Obama’s trip to Cooperstown

First sitting president to ever visit the Baseball Hall of Fame. It opened in 1939.
baseballhall, also on tumblr

brooklynmutt:

The single best photo of President Obama’s trip to Cooperstown

First sitting president to ever visit the Baseball Hall of Fame. It opened in 1939.

baseballhall, also on tumblr

baseballhall:

In this exclusive for Memories & Dreams subscribers, the Hall of Fame digs into its vast film and video archive to show you an excerpt from an interview with Clyde Sukeforth. Sukeforth was the Brooklyn Dodgers scout sent by Branch Rickey to see Jackie Robinson and bring him back to New York to meet with Rickey.

The Baseball Hall of Fame is the best museum ever.

The number of players elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame by the Baseball Writers Association of America.
Craig Biggio earned 68% of the vote (players need 75%), 39 votes shy of induction.
The last time the BBWAA did not elect a single recently retired player was 1996 when Phil Neikro received 68.3% of the vote. Other years where no player received the necessary 75% were 1971 (Yogi Berra, 67%), 1960 (Edd Roush, 54%), 1958 (Max Carey 51%), 1950 (Mel Ott, 68.5%), 1949 (charlie Gehringer, 67%). (Thanks to Baseball-Reference.com)

The number of players elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame by the Baseball Writers Association of America.

Craig Biggio earned 68% of the vote (players need 75%), 39 votes shy of induction.

The last time the BBWAA did not elect a single recently retired player was 1996 when Phil Neikro received 68.3% of the vote. Other years where no player received the necessary 75% were 1971 (Yogi Berra, 67%), 1960 (Edd Roush, 54%), 1958 (Max Carey 51%), 1950 (Mel Ott, 68.5%), 1949 (charlie Gehringer, 67%). (Thanks to Baseball-Reference.com)

baseballhall:

Want to spend the summer in Cooperstown as an intern at the Hall of Fame? Application deadline is Jan. 31.
http://bit.ly/SYHyDI http://on.fb.me/Z8ZEDV

I was lucky enough to intern at the Baseball Hall of Fame in the summers of 1996 and 1997. It was incredible. I attended two induction ceremonies, had my name printed in the acknowledgements of The Baseball Timeline by Burt Solomon, almost spilled a pitcher of water on Tom Seaver, spoke with Bowie Kuhn, touched the scorecard from Cal Ripken’s 2,131st game (his name is spelled wrong), saw the “Shot Heard ‘Round the World” scorecard where Russ Hodges forget to write in Bobby Thomson’s home run because he was too busy shouting “The Giants Win the Pennant,” met Rachel Robinson (Jackie’s widow), and interacted with hundreds of regular baseball fans who were looking for information about their fathers’, grandfathers’, and uncles’ playing careers.
And the staff were some of the nicest people I’ve ever worked with.
So you have nothing to lose by applying…and everything to gain.
- Josh

baseballhall:

Want to spend the summer in Cooperstown as an intern at the Hall of Fame? Application deadline is Jan. 31.

http://bit.ly/SYHyDI http://on.fb.me/Z8ZEDV

I was lucky enough to intern at the Baseball Hall of Fame in the summers of 1996 and 1997. It was incredible. I attended two induction ceremonies, had my name printed in the acknowledgements of The Baseball Timeline by Burt Solomon, almost spilled a pitcher of water on Tom Seaver, spoke with Bowie Kuhn, touched the scorecard from Cal Ripken’s 2,131st game (his name is spelled wrong), saw the “Shot Heard ‘Round the World” scorecard where Russ Hodges forget to write in Bobby Thomson’s home run because he was too busy shouting “The Giants Win the Pennant,” met Rachel Robinson (Jackie’s widow), and interacted with hundreds of regular baseball fans who were looking for information about their fathers’, grandfathers’, and uncles’ playing careers.

And the staff were some of the nicest people I’ve ever worked with.

So you have nothing to lose by applying…and everything to gain.

- Josh

The Hall of Fame Induction Speech Vicki Santo Should Give
Good afternoon. Thank you so much to all those who made today possible, especially the great Cubs’ fans who have always loved my husband whether on the field or in the broadcast booth.
When Ron retired from baseball in 1974 he finished his career with 342 home runs, 2254 hits, 1331 RBIs, five Gold Gloves, and nine All-Star appearances.
Six years later, when Ron was first eligible for election to the Hall of Fame he had 342 home runs, 2254 hits, 1331 RBIs, five Gold Gloves, and nine All-Star appearances. He earned 3.9% of the vote and was removed from the ballot.
In 1985 when Ron and several other players were returned to the Baseball Writers Association of America ballot, he had 342 home runs, 2254 hits, 1331 RBIs, five Gold Gloves, and nine All-Star appearances. He received 13.4% of the vote.
When he last appeared on the writers’ ballots in 1998, he had 342 home runs, 2254 hits, 1331 RBIs, five Gold Gloves, and nine All-Star appearances. He received 43.1% of the vote.
When his left leg was amputated in 2001, due to complications from the juvenile diabetes he dealt with during his entire playing career, he had 342 home runs, 2254 hits, 1331 RBIs, five Gold Gloves, and nine All-Star appearances.
The next year saw him lose his right leg and he had 342 home runs, 2254 hits, 1331 RBIs, five Gold Gloves, and nine All-Star appearances.
When the Veterans’ Committee voted on Ron in 2003, 2005, 2007, and 2009 he had 342 home runs, 2254 hits, 1331 RBIs, five Gold Gloves, and nine All-Star appearances. He finished as high as first in the balloting but never with enough votes to be admitted to the Hall.
When Ron passed away on December 3, 2010 he had 342 home runs, 2254 hits, 1331 RBIs, five Gold Gloves, and nine All-Star appearances.
One year and two days later, on December 5, 2011, Ron Santo was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame. He had 342 home runs, 2254 hits, 1331 RBIs, five Gold Gloves, and nine All-Star appearances. Fifteen of sixteen members of the committee voted for Ron, giving him 93% of the vote.
Today, as I stand before Ron’s fans, teammates, friends, and, now, fellow Hall of Famers, on July 22, 2012, he still has 342 home runs, 2254 hits, 1331 RBIs, five Gold Gloves, and nine All-Star appearances.
Not one more home run, hit, RBI, Gold Glove, or All-Star game in 38 years. I could not be any prouder of my husband. He never once complained. Not about perennial losing seasons with the Cubs, not about his problems with diabetes, and certainly not about the Hall of Fame. And if he were here today he would not complain about how long it took, how his statistics didn’t change, or how he hasn’t improved as a third basemen over the last four decades. He is smiling today and I’m sure he’s doing a little heel click in Heaven.
But I’m not Ron and I just want to remind everyone that my husband had 342 home runs, 2254 hits, 1331 RBIs, five Gold Gloves, and nine All-Star appearances during his career. He was a Hall of Famer the day he retired. He didn’t become one over the last 38 years.
Thank you.
Sources: baseball-reference.com and wikipedia.org
(Image of Ron Santo clicking his heels after another Wrigley win during the 1969 season is courtesy of 90feetofperfection.com)

The Hall of Fame Induction Speech Vicki Santo Should Give

Good afternoon. Thank you so much to all those who made today possible, especially the great Cubs’ fans who have always loved my husband whether on the field or in the broadcast booth.

When Ron retired from baseball in 1974 he finished his career with 342 home runs, 2254 hits, 1331 RBIs, five Gold Gloves, and nine All-Star appearances.

Six years later, when Ron was first eligible for election to the Hall of Fame he had 342 home runs, 2254 hits, 1331 RBIs, five Gold Gloves, and nine All-Star appearances. He earned 3.9% of the vote and was removed from the ballot.

In 1985 when Ron and several other players were returned to the Baseball Writers Association of America ballot, he had 342 home runs, 2254 hits, 1331 RBIs, five Gold Gloves, and nine All-Star appearances. He received 13.4% of the vote.

When he last appeared on the writers’ ballots in 1998, he had 342 home runs, 2254 hits, 1331 RBIs, five Gold Gloves, and nine All-Star appearances. He received 43.1% of the vote.

When his left leg was amputated in 2001, due to complications from the juvenile diabetes he dealt with during his entire playing career, he had 342 home runs, 2254 hits, 1331 RBIs, five Gold Gloves, and nine All-Star appearances.

The next year saw him lose his right leg and he had 342 home runs, 2254 hits, 1331 RBIs, five Gold Gloves, and nine All-Star appearances.

When the Veterans’ Committee voted on Ron in 2003, 2005, 2007, and 2009 he had 342 home runs, 2254 hits, 1331 RBIs, five Gold Gloves, and nine All-Star appearances. He finished as high as first in the balloting but never with enough votes to be admitted to the Hall.

When Ron passed away on December 3, 2010 he had 342 home runs, 2254 hits, 1331 RBIs, five Gold Gloves, and nine All-Star appearances.

One year and two days later, on December 5, 2011, Ron Santo was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame. He had 342 home runs, 2254 hits, 1331 RBIs, five Gold Gloves, and nine All-Star appearances. Fifteen of sixteen members of the committee voted for Ron, giving him 93% of the vote.

Today, as I stand before Ron’s fans, teammates, friends, and, now, fellow Hall of Famers, on July 22, 2012, he still has 342 home runs, 2254 hits, 1331 RBIs, five Gold Gloves, and nine All-Star appearances.

Not one more home run, hit, RBI, Gold Glove, or All-Star game in 38 years. I could not be any prouder of my husband. He never once complained. Not about perennial losing seasons with the Cubs, not about his problems with diabetes, and certainly not about the Hall of Fame. And if he were here today he would not complain about how long it took, how his statistics didn’t change, or how he hasn’t improved as a third basemen over the last four decades. He is smiling today and I’m sure he’s doing a little heel click in Heaven.

But I’m not Ron and I just want to remind everyone that my husband had 342 home runs, 2254 hits, 1331 RBIs, five Gold Gloves, and nine All-Star appearances during his career. He was a Hall of Famer the day he retired. He didn’t become one over the last 38 years.

Thank you.

Sources: baseball-reference.com and wikipedia.org

(Image of Ron Santo clicking his heels after another Wrigley win during the 1969 season is courtesy of 90feetofperfection.com)

The National Baseball Hall of Fame has released a trivia app for iPhone. Answer as many trivia questions in 90 seconds as you can.  It costs $1.99. 
Tried it out myself and have to say it’s a nice mix of easy (What’s the first domed stadium?) and more difficult (Who has the lowest career WHIP?). It’s multiple choice format. You get points for the correct answer and time you take. If you get the answer right, the crowd cheers. If you get it wrong, you get boos. (Even after getting 8 correct to begin one game, the crowd booed after my first incorrect answer. Must be Phillies fans.)
There are other HOF apps for the Cubs, Yankees, Phillies, Reds, and Red Sox, also for $1.99.
The Android app is available next month.
Enjoy.

The National Baseball Hall of Fame has released a trivia app for iPhone. Answer as many trivia questions in 90 seconds as you can.  It costs $1.99. 

Tried it out myself and have to say it’s a nice mix of easy (What’s the first domed stadium?) and more difficult (Who has the lowest career WHIP?). It’s multiple choice format. You get points for the correct answer and time you take. If you get the answer right, the crowd cheers. If you get it wrong, you get boos. (Even after getting 8 correct to begin one game, the crowd booed after my first incorrect answer. Must be Phillies fans.)

There are other HOF apps for the Cubs, Yankees, Phillies, Reds, and Red Sox, also for $1.99.

The Android app is available next month.

Enjoy.