Um, I, um…

The Cubs just gave up 9 runs in the 4th inning to the Angels including a Mike Trout grand slam.
It was the longest 4th inning in Cactus League history. Bodes well for the Cubbies, huh?

H/t Jesse Rogers (@ESPNChiCubs)

The greatest “bad ball” hitter of all-time retired over the weekend. 
Vlad “The Impaler” Guerrero officially ended his baseball career, although he hasn’t played in the majors since 2011. 
At his peak from 1998-2007 (Expos and Angels) Vlad hit .327/.394/.586. (For the non-math folk, that’s a .980 OPS.) He also averaged 35 doubles, 35 HRs, 114 RBI and 16 SB. And in 2010 he hit 29, 115, .300 (.841 OPS).
Great arm (top 5 in RF assists for 10 seasons; led all RF in 2001, 2002, and 2004; led all OF in NL, 2002 and AL, 2004). Not-so-great glove (led all NL OF in errors from 1997-2002). 
2004 AL MVP and 7 Silver Sluggers.
Career numbers: 2590 H, 449 HR, 1496 RBI, .318 AVG, .931 OPS
Baseball-Reference.com compares him most favorably to Jeff Bagwell, Larry Walker, Willie Stargell, Billy Williams, Albert Pujols. Duke Snider, and Todd Helton.
And he once hit a home run off a ball that bounced before it reached the plate. 
Image: Vladimir Guerrero of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim bats during a game against the Oakland Athletics at McAfee Coliseum in Oakland, CA on April 22, 2006. (Photo by Brad Mangin)

The greatest “bad ball” hitter of all-time retired over the weekend. 

Vlad “The Impaler” Guerrero officially ended his baseball career, although he hasn’t played in the majors since 2011. 

At his peak from 1998-2007 (Expos and Angels) Vlad hit .327/.394/.586. (For the non-math folk, that’s a .980 OPS.) He also averaged 35 doubles, 35 HRs, 114 RBI and 16 SB. And in 2010 he hit 29, 115, .300 (.841 OPS).

Great arm (top 5 in RF assists for 10 seasons; led all RF in 2001, 2002, and 2004; led all OF in NL, 2002 and AL, 2004). Not-so-great glove (led all NL OF in errors from 1997-2002). 

2004 AL MVP and 7 Silver Sluggers.

Career numbers: 2590 H, 449 HR, 1496 RBI, .318 AVG, .931 OPS

Baseball-Reference.com compares him most favorably to Jeff Bagwell, Larry Walker, Willie Stargell, Billy Williams, Albert Pujols. Duke Snider, and Todd Helton.

And he once hit a home run off a ball that bounced before it reached the plate. 

Image: Vladimir Guerrero of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim bats during a game against the Oakland Athletics at McAfee Coliseum in Oakland, CA on April 22, 2006. (Photo by Brad Mangin)

angels:

J.B. Shuck may have made the catch of the year tonight.

Shuck’s

angels:

J.B. Shuck may have made the catch of the year tonight.

Shuck’s

Welp.

Welp.

Guess who became the fastest player in MLB to reach 50 HR and 50 SB in a career?
This guy, in only 266 games.
(Thanks to @Jacob_Jaffee)

Guess who became the fastest player in MLB to reach 50 HR and 50 SB in a career?

This guy, in only 266 games.

(Thanks to @Jacob_Jaffee)

So this happened

Angels  110 040 100 000 001 000 0

A’s        000 101 041 000 001 000 2

WP - Jerry Blevins  LP- Barry Enright

Brandon Moss hit a walk-off 2-run homer in the bottom of the 19th.


Interesting stats

At-bats: Angels, 70; A’s, 71

Worst night: Angels - Josh Hamilton, 0-8, 3 Ks

                    A’s - Yoenis Cespedes, 1-8, 4 Ks

Pitchers used: Angels, 8; A’s 8

Time of game: 6:32 (longest game in A’s history)

The game ended at 1:42 PDT. And the A’s still had a post-game show.


Random fact: The Mets and Marlins played a 15-inning game that lasted 5:32. The Marlins won 4-3 on a sacrifice fly.


Random, depressing fact: The Angels are off to their worst start in history, 9-16.

In an unusual Jackie Robinson tribute, Josh Hamilton waited until his 42nd at-bat of the season to homer.

Mike Trout hats.
Last one out shut off the internet.
(via @Alden_Gonzalez)

Mike Trout hats.

Last one out shut off the internet.

(via @Alden_Gonzalez)

Wow.
@MikeTrout20 on the Josh Hamilton/Angels deal
Josh Hamilton has agreed to terms on a five-year contract with the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim.
That’s an interesting turn of events.
Image courtesy of fwweekly.com

Josh Hamilton has agreed to terms on a five-year contract with the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim.

That’s an interesting turn of events.

Image courtesy of fwweekly.com

Meet the German God of Walks

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: “The Walking Man”
Eddie Yost had a very good eye. Over 18 seasons, Yost would take four balls earning a free trip to first base 1,614 times. He led the American League in bases on balls six times. When he retired at the end of the 1962 season, Yost would be fourth all-time in walks; today he’s eleventh. His propensity for earning the free pass would also give him his nickname, “The Walking Man.”
Unfortunately for Yost, getting on base did not lead often to scoring since he played a majority of his career with the Washington Senators (“First in war, first in peace, and last in the American League”). Joining the team as an eighteen-year old rookie in 1944, Yost would play with the organization for 14 seasons, finishing with a winning record only twice (1945 and 1952) and finishing above fifth place in the eight-team league only once (also in ‘45).
After the 1958 season, the popular Yost was traded to the Detroit Tigers spending two seasons in Michigan before being dealt to the expansion Los Angeles Angels. Eddie would make history as the first batter in the history of the Angels franchise, leading off on the road against the Baltimore Orioles on April 11, 1961. (Yost would go 0-4, with a walk - of course.)
Following his playing career, Yost would become a coach for the new Washington Senators franchise*, the Mets (including as a member of the 1969 World Series champions), and the Red Sox. The one-time All-Star (1952) would pass away on October 16, 2012 - three days after his 86th birthday.
*The first Senators franchise, where Yost starred, moved to Minnesota before 1961 to become the Twins. The next Senators team would play until 1971 in D.C. then move to Arlington, Texas and renaming themselves the Rangers.
Sources: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, baseball-reference.com, retrosheet.org
(Image of Yost’s 1955 Topps card is copyright of Topps, Inc. and courtesy of baseball simulator.com)
Here’s a link to another great piece on Yost, via The Hall of Very Good.

Meet the German God of Walks

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: “The Walking Man”

Eddie Yost had a very good eye. Over 18 seasons, Yost would take four balls earning a free trip to first base 1,614 times. He led the American League in bases on balls six times. When he retired at the end of the 1962 season, Yost would be fourth all-time in walks; today he’s eleventh. His propensity for earning the free pass would also give him his nickname, “The Walking Man.”

Unfortunately for Yost, getting on base did not lead often to scoring since he played a majority of his career with the Washington Senators (“First in war, first in peace, and last in the American League”). Joining the team as an eighteen-year old rookie in 1944, Yost would play with the organization for 14 seasons, finishing with a winning record only twice (1945 and 1952) and finishing above fifth place in the eight-team league only once (also in ‘45).

After the 1958 season, the popular Yost was traded to the Detroit Tigers spending two seasons in Michigan before being dealt to the expansion Los Angeles Angels. Eddie would make history as the first batter in the history of the Angels franchise, leading off on the road against the Baltimore Orioles on April 11, 1961. (Yost would go 0-4, with a walk - of course.)

Following his playing career, Yost would become a coach for the new Washington Senators franchise*, the Mets (including as a member of the 1969 World Series champions), and the Red Sox. The one-time All-Star (1952) would pass away on October 16, 2012 - three days after his 86th birthday.

*The first Senators franchise, where Yost starred, moved to Minnesota before 1961 to become the Twins. The next Senators team would play until 1971 in D.C. then move to Arlington, Texas and renaming themselves the Rangers.

Sources: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, baseball-reference.com, retrosheet.org

(Image of Yost’s 1955 Topps card is copyright of Topps, Inc. and courtesy of baseball simulator.com)

Here’s a link to another great piece on Yost, via The Hall of Very Good.

It’s the most wonderful time of the year. (AL edition)

Schedules for the AL playoff contenders:

Yankees

12 home, 16 away - opponents’ winning % (as of 9/4): .497 

Orioles

13 home, 14 away - opponents’ winning %: .512

Rays

15 home, 12 away - opponents’ winning %: .529

Tigers

12 home, 16 away - opponents’ winning %: .487

White Sox

16 home, 12 away - opponents’ winning %: .483

Rangers

13 home, 15 away - opponents’ winning %: .502

A’s

11 home, 17 away - opponents’ winning %: .546

Angels 

16 home, 11 away - opponents’ winning %: .530

In one of those great baseball coincidences, the Yankees (2), Rangers (3), Tigers (7), and Angels (8) are all in the top ten in per game attendance. While the Orioles (23), White Sox (24), A’s (29), and Rays (30) are in the bottom ten.


Don’t do it for me, do it for yourself.

Angels’ pitcher Jerome Williams’ mother’s last words. He has them written on the underside of his cap brim.

via Vin Scully on KLAC radio & MLB AtBat 2012