MLB Off-Season

Apr 23

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: The Oldest Living Major League Baseball Player
Conrado “Connie” Marrero played all of five seasons of major league baseball. Pitching for the woeful Washington Senators, Mr. Marrero compiled a 39-40 career won-loss record, but earned a spot on the 1951 American League All-Star team and even a 1952 MVP vote.
Unusual for baseball, Mr. Marrero was a 39-year-old rookie in 1950 having coming up from the Havana Cubans where he won the Florida International League MVP going 25-8 and pitching a league-record 44 scoreless innings.
He was proud of his rural upbringing and was nicknamed “El Guajiro de Laberinto,” “The Peasant from Leberinto” during his years playing in Cuban amateur and professional leagues. Squat, stading at only five feet, five inches tall and weighing 158 pounds, Mr. Marrero was known for his mix of sliders and curves.
Mr. Marrero’s major league career ended after the 1954 season when he was the oldest active player at age 43. He returned to Cuba where he managed the Havana Sugar Kings of the Cuban League. When Fidel Castro took control in 1959, Mr. Marrero remained in Cuba and lived out the remainder of his life there. 
In 1999 when the Baltimore Orioles came to Cuba for an exhibition series against the Cuban national team, Mr. Marrero threw out the first pitch. 
Conrado Marrero died on April 23, 2014 at the age of 102 - two days shy of his 103rd birthday. Upon Mr. Marrero’s death, veteran infielder Mike Sandlock is now the oldest living ex-major leaguer at 98.
Sources: CBSSports.com, Wikipedia, and Baseball-Reference.com
(Image 1953 Topps card of Conrado “Connie” Marrero is copyright of Topps, Inc. and courtesy of goldenagebaseballcards.com)

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: The Oldest Living Major League Baseball Player

Conrado “Connie” Marrero played all of five seasons of major league baseball. Pitching for the woeful Washington Senators, Mr. Marrero compiled a 39-40 career won-loss record, but earned a spot on the 1951 American League All-Star team and even a 1952 MVP vote.

Unusual for baseball, Mr. Marrero was a 39-year-old rookie in 1950 having coming up from the Havana Cubans where he won the Florida International League MVP going 25-8 and pitching a league-record 44 scoreless innings.

He was proud of his rural upbringing and was nicknamed “El Guajiro de Laberinto,” “The Peasant from Leberinto” during his years playing in Cuban amateur and professional leagues. Squat, stading at only five feet, five inches tall and weighing 158 pounds, Mr. Marrero was known for his mix of sliders and curves.

Mr. Marrero’s major league career ended after the 1954 season when he was the oldest active player at age 43. He returned to Cuba where he managed the Havana Sugar Kings of the Cuban League. When Fidel Castro took control in 1959, Mr. Marrero remained in Cuba and lived out the remainder of his life there. 

In 1999 when the Baltimore Orioles came to Cuba for an exhibition series against the Cuban national team, Mr. Marrero threw out the first pitch. 

Conrado Marrero died on April 23, 2014 at the age of 102 - two days shy of his 103rd birthday. Upon Mr. Marrero’s death, veteran infielder Mike Sandlock is now the oldest living ex-major leaguer at 98.

Sources: CBSSports.com, Wikipedia, and Baseball-Reference.com

(Image 1953 Topps card of Conrado “Connie” Marrero is copyright of Topps, Inc. and courtesy of goldenagebaseballcards.com)

The next stadium to celebrate its 100th anniversary?

Dodgers Stadium….in 2062.

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If you hit 500 home runs and no one cares did it make a sound?

Albert Pujols hit home runs 499 and 500 last night and the reaction is rather “ho-hum.” Here’s a reminder as to why.

Number of hitters reaching 500 home runs by decade:

1920s - 1 (Babe Ruth)

1930s - 0

1940s - 2 (Jimmie Foxx, Mel Ott)

1950s - 0

1960s - 5 (Ted Williams, Willie Mays, Mickey Mantle, Eddie Matthews, Hank Aaron)

1970s - 4 (Ernie Banks, Harmon KIllebrew, Frank Robinson, Willie McCovey)

1980s - 2 (Reggie Jackson, Mike Schmidt)

1990s - 2 (Eddie Murray, Mark McGwire)

2000s - 9 (Barry Bonds, Sammy Sosa, Rafael Palmeiro, Ken Griffey, Jr., Frank Thomas, Alex Rodriguez, Jim Thome, Manny Ramirez, Gary Sheffield

2010s - 1 (Albert Pujols)

You can say what you want about PED users but diluting the importance of 500 home runs was the biggest impact. And we can also stop pretending that steroids didn’t help with power. (This does not mean that the players shouldn’t be in the Hall of Fame, heck pitchers were using too.) 

Maybe people will give Pujols more credit if he’s the only 500 home run hitter of the decade. (Unless you think he took PEDs, too.) But until we get back closer to the norm we’re going to yawn when we hear someone crossed the 500-home run plateau.

Apr 22

No. Stop.

No. Stop.

Apr 21

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Apr 20

Apr 19

mlb:

Bartolo Colon swings very hard. 

Yes, please keep telling me that the DH ruins the game. 

mlb:

Bartolo Colon swings very hard. 

Yes, please keep telling me that the DH ruins the game. 

Delino DeShields Jr. took a 90+ MPH fastball to the face. 

It left a mark.

Delino DeShields Jr. took a 90+ MPH fastball to the face.

It left a mark.

Apr 18

mlb:

A healthy cut by Billy Hamilton.

It was “Swing Like a 6-Year-Old” Day in MLB.

mlb:

A healthy cut by Billy Hamilton.

It was “Swing Like a 6-Year-Old” Day in MLB.

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